Operating Mobility Devices at Rail Crossings Safely

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NEWS RELEASE

 

CN Police Want to Raise Awareness About How to Operate Mobility Devices at Rail Crossings Safely

CN Police officers are spreading a rail safety message in the RM of MacDonald about the use of mobility devices at rail crossings. Last year in North America, there were over 3,400 collisions with trains, resulting in over 2,200 serious injuries or fatalities. Rail safety is a core value at CN and CN Police wants to be a part of the effort to minimize the risk of accidents at rail crossings. 

 

Whether people are using a wheelchair, walker or a scooter, they will most likely come across train tracks at some point, and tracks pose particular challenges for people using wheeled mobility devices. It is important that mobility device users only use designated railway crossings. They must also remember that some mobility devices struck by trains at railway crossings are hit, not by the first train approaching, but by the second train, which may be hidden by the first train. If someone is in need of assistance, it is important to notify emergency responders by calling 911.

 

“Safety is a core value at CN and we want to take every opportunity to raise awareness on safe behaviour around rail. It is our job to make sure that the population of the RM of MacDonald know the risks associated with the use of mobility devices at railway crossings. It is important for CN Police officers to engage the population on the dangers related to a railway incident. We want everyone to Be Rail Smart: “Stop. Look. Listen. Live.“

  • Cst. Dustin Schollenberg, CN Police 

 

How to stay safe at railway crossings with mobility device for your audience:

  • Only cross railway tracks at designated crossings, where the tracks are most level with the ground.  
  • Cross the tracks at a 90-degree angle, or as close to it as possible.   
  • If your mobility device is stuck, move to a safe distance away from the tracks.
  • Remember that trains are wider than the tracks. They can extend on both sides of the track by as much as one metre, so keep your distance.  
  • Be rail-smart: “Stop. Look. Listen. Live”.

For additional safety tips or other information regarding rail safety or CN Police, follow this link: https://www.cn.ca/en/safety/cn-police-service/ 

For information or an interview with CN Police, contact:

Mathieu Gaudreault

Senior Advisor

Public Affairs and Media Relations

514-249-4735

Mathieu.gaudreault@cn.ca